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Paul Amaning Defends Supreme Court, Says No One Is Above The Law

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Paul Amaning, the Eastern Region New Patriotic Party (NPP) Chairman hopeful, has agreed with the ruling of the Apex Court supporting the fact that Deputy Speakers are allowed to vote while leading proceedings in the house bringing some uneasy calm amongst the political class as the opposition does not agree with the ruling of the Apex court. The issue came up in the lead up to the approval of the 2022 budget.

He argued that the onus lies on the Judiciary to interpret the law of the land, debunking the Minority’s claims that the ruling amounts to the interference of the legislature.

He further explained that no one is above the law of the country hence the legislature must respect the ruling of the Supreme Court.

“There is nobody or organ in the Ghanaian state that is above the laws of the land. To suggest that Parliament should operate without interference is to advocate for the very matter we have tried to avoid, the concentration of power. We have had that experience before and don’t want that,” Paul Amaning exclusively told Okogyeabour Ocran Accra-based Kingdom FM 107.7

On Wednesday, March 9, 2022, The Supreme Court, in a landmark ruling stated that Deputy Speakers of Parliament can take part in voting while presiding over proceedings of the house in the absence of the Speaker of Parliament.

The said case was brought by a law professor, Justice Abdulai, who was contesting the First Deputy Speaker’s decision to count himself to form a quorum for voting on the 2022 budget.

The Court also quashed order 109 (3) of the Standing Orders of Parliament, describing it as unconstitutional.

Some are of the view that this judgment interferes with the business of Parliament.

But  Paul Amaning disagrees with this assertion and was happy with the ruling.

He said he was astonished at “how much public energy has been wasted in an area or issue where there is so much clarity.”

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